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General Sericulture

By Dr Rohith L Shankar   |   University of Mysore, Mysuru
Learners enrolled: 368
Silk is fibrous protein of animal origin.  A number of organisms secrete silk, which used by them for anchorage, entangling their prey or forming a protective sheath with or without other materials.  Nearly 400-500 species are known to produce silk but only very few are commercially exploited.  Silk is classified into insect silk and non insect silk. Insect silk is commercially more important.  The majority of silk producing insects belong to the Order Lepidoptera, Super family Bombycoidea and Families Bombycidae or Saturniidae.  Nearly 75% of commercial insect silk comes from the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori and is known as mulberry silk.  Commercial silk from all other sources is collectively called non-mulberry silks or vanya silks or wild silks.

The silk obtained from the different sources particularly that obtained from the mulberry silkworm is a natural fibre used in textile.  It is soft, smooth and lustrous and holds a prestigious place among textile fibres to the extent to be called the ‘Queen of Textiles’. Mulberry silkworm is a monophagous insect, which feeds only on mulberry leaves.  Mulberry includes a number of species and varieties. They differ in their suitability for silkworm rearing because of their varying nutritious value and palatability for the silkworm. Mulberry sericulture involves the cultivation of mulberry to produce leaf, rearing of silkworm to convert leaf to cocoon, reeling of cocoons to obtain silk yarn and weaving to convert yarn to fabrics.

The silk is obtained from both insect and non-insect fauna. The insect fauna mainly comprises of mulberry and non-mulberry silkworms. In India, mulberry silk contribute to an extent 75% and it is a natural fibre used in textile industry. It is soft, smooth and lustrous and holds a prestigious place among textile fibres and commonly called as the ‘Queen of Textiles’. Mulberry silkworm is a monophagous insect, which feeds only on mulberry leaves.  Mulberry includes a number of species and varieties. Mulberry sericulture involves the cultivation of mulberry to produce leaf, rearing of silkworm to convert leaf to cocoon, reeling of cocoons to obtain silk yarn and weaving to convert yarn to fabrics.

Summary
Course Status : Completed
Course Type : Elective
Duration : 12 weeks
Start Date : 15 Jul 2019
End Date : 30 Sep 2019
Exam Date : 09 Nov 2019 IST
Enrollment Ends : 10 Sep 2019
Category :
  • Biological Sciences & Bioengineering
Credit Points : 4
Level : Undergraduate



Course layout

Week – I | 1. Introduction to Sericulture | 2. Origin and History of Sericulture | 3. Silk Route | 

Week – II | 4. Components of Sericulture | 5. Sericulture Industry in India | 6. Central Silk Board | 7. Types of Cocoon and Silk |  

Week – III | 8. Mulberry Sericulture | 9. The genus Morus and its Species | 10. Popular Mulberry Cultivars in Karnataka and India | 11.Non-Mulberry and its Food Plants |

Week - IV | 12. Classification of Mulberry Silkworm | 13. Sericigenous Fauna | 14. Silkworm Races  | 15. Different Species of Non-Mulberry Silkworms | 

Week – V | 16. Mulberry Nutrition | 17. Mulberry Cultivation in Irrigated and Rainfed Gardens | 18. Soil Type of India | 19. Soil for Mulberry|

Week – VI | 20. History of Reeling Industry | 21. Qualities of Different Types of Textiles | 22. Advantages of Silk Fibre | 23. Constraints in Silk Production |

Week – VII | 24. Different Types of Cocoon | 25. Cocoon Testing and Grading | 26.Types of Cocoon Boiling |

Week - VIII | 27. Reeling Machinery | 28. Reeling Process | 29. Reeling Water | 30.Types Reeling Machine |

Week – IX | 31. Twisting and Weaving | 32. Raw Silk Testing and Grading | 33. Silk ‘Queen of Fibers’ | 

Week - X | 34. Power loom | 35. Cocoon Marketing and Silk | 36. Women in Sericulture |

Week - XI | 37. Mechanization in Sericulture | 38.Sericulture vis-a-vis other Agricultural Enterprises | 39. Income and Employment Generation in Sericulture | 40. Problems and Prospects of Sericulture | 


Books and references


Reading material

Author

Type of publication (article/notes)

Content Abstract

Number of pages

Manual on Sericulture.

FAO Agricultural Services Bulletin, Rome. (1987)

Text Book

1. Mulberry cultivation

2. Silkworm Rearing

3. Silk reeling

4. Non-mulberry silks

131

Handbook of Practical Sericulture. Central Silk Board, Bangalore,

Ullal, S.R. and Narasimhanna, M.N. (1994)

Text Book

Mulberry cultivation,  silkworm rearing, etc.

213

Handbook of Sericulture Technologies. Central Silk Board, Bangalore.

Dandin, S.B., Jayant Jayaswal and Giridhar, K. (2003)

Text Book

Mulberry cultivation, silkworm seed production, silkworm rearing and silk technology, etc.,

287

Principles and Techniques of Silkworm Seed Production. Discovery Publishing House, New Delhi.

Tribhuwan Singh and Beera Sarathchandra (2004)

Text Book

Activities of grainage, silkworm egg production processes, etc.

349.

Introduction to Sericulture. Oxford and IBH Pub. Co. Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi, p

Ganga, G. and Sulochana Chetty, J. (2010)

Text Book

Origin and history of sericulture, central Silk board, mulberry sericulture, morphology and anatomy of Bombyx mori, silkworm rearing etc.,

302


Instructor bio



Dr. Rohith L Shankar, Principal Investigator for General Sericulture course under Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) currently working as Assistant Professor in the Department of Sericulture, Yuvaraja’s College, University of Mysore, Mysuru. I have obtained Bachelor’s degree in Life science, Master’s and Doctoral Degrees in Sericulture from the University of Mysore, Mysuru. I have also done post doctoral studies in the field of seri-biotechnology in Animal Sciences College, Zhejiang University, China. In addition I have obtained Diploma in Office Management and HRM. I have passed National Eligibility Test conducted by Karnataka State Govt. for eligibility to become Lecturer. I have about twenty three years of research experience and twenty years of teaching experience in Sericulture. My fields of specialization include Insect Breeding and Genetics, and biochemical aspects in allied subjects. I have Undergone hands on training programme in pest management and gene expression studies and also worked as a Junior Research Fellow in a leading tissue culture laboratory, In-Vitro International Pvt. Ltd., Bangalore. I have published 23 research articles in leading National and International journals; I have participated in more than 40 National/International Conferences/Seminars and presented around 15 research articles. I am having a life membership of academic bodies like Indian Science Congress, Kolkata and Karnataka Vigyan Parishat, Bangalore. I have also associated in the development of curricula for undergraduate and post graduate courses in Sericulture. I have been serving as an external examiner in Sericulture in different universities. Presently guiding a student leading to a Ph.D degree in the area of Silkworm breeding.

Course certificate

30 % for in Course Assessment and 70 % of End term Proctored Exam 


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